Fall Term 2013 - Courses and Workshops

We are proud to offer the following courses and workshops for the Fall 2013 term. Our courses span a wide range of topics and special interests. While there are no exams or grades, some classes may assign at-home readings. Classes typically have 15-25 students, although some may have enrollments exceeding 50. Single-term membership entitles members to take three courses.

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal Era

Instructor: Cedric Cowing, UHM Professor Emeritus, History
Dates: Thurs. Sept. 26; Tues. Oct. 1; Thurs. Oct. 3
Time: 10 am to Noon
Location: Krauss 112

Description: In this course, we will examine Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s early life, his evolution from progressive to New Dealer, and the significant role of Eleanor. After the stock market crash of 1929 and Roosevelt’s election in 1932, the new administration created an alphabet soup of new federal agencies. How effective was it in coping with the Great Depression? We’ll also explore foreign policy--isolationism and interventionism--from World War I to Pearl Harbor, and have opportunities to share our recollections of FDR and his era, and discuss the relevance to today’s political, economic, and social conditions.

Dis/Order in the Court

Dis/Order in the Court

Instructor: Sue Nance, American Studies, BA, MA, ABD
Dates: Mon. Sept. 30, Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28, Nov. 4
Time: 9:30 am - 11:30 am|
Location: Krauss 112 and 111
Enrollment limit: 24

Description: The Supreme Court, created by the Constitution to provide an unbiased balance for the Executive and Legislative branches, has grown more politicized in recent years and many critically important cases have been decided in 5-4 decisions. Is this a new direction for the Court, or has it been an ongoing reflection of the temper of its times? We’ll examine some key decisions made over 200 years of Constitutional history and discuss them in the context of their times.

George Eliot’s Middlemarch

George Eliot’s Middlemarch

Instructor: Nancy Alpert Mower, MA, UHM English
Dates: Fri. Sept. 27, Oct. 4, 11, 18, 25, Nov. 1, 8, 15, 22, Dec. 6
Time: 10 am-Noon
Location: Krauss 113-B
Enrollment limit: 12

Description: Virginia Woolf called Middlemarch "one of the few English novels written for grown-up people." Martin Amis and Julian Barnes both described it as the greatest novel in the English language. Middlemarch was the sixth of seven novels written by Mary Ann Evans, who used the pen name George Eliot because women writers were not taken seriously in 19th century England. In this novel she presents stories of residents of a small English town in 1832. It has been said that the novel is notable for its "deep psychological insight and sophisticated character portraits," all of which will provide plenty of material for fascinating class discussions.

Shakespeare: Live at the Globe and Stratford

Shakespeare: Live at the Globe and Stratford

Instructor: Jim Hesse, Musician and Actor
Dates: Thurs. Sept. 26, Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31
Time: 1 pm - 4 pm
Location: Krauss 111

Description: Seeing Shakespeare performed by actors on stage deepens the enjoyment of the experience and reveals the humanity of the playwright’s works. In this class, we’ll enjoy and discuss filmed stage productions of a few of Shakespeare’s comedies, histories, and tragedies including:

Homer’s Iliad

Homer’s Iliad (in translation)

Instructor: David Johnson; BA, Yale; JD, Harvard
Dates: Tues. Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26, Dec. 3 and 10
Time: 2 pm - 4 pm
Location: Krauss 112

Description: Homer’s Iliad - probably the earliest Greek masterpiece - is the story of the Trojan War. It illustrates how similar to today were Bronze Age people, and how different was their culture. The Trojan War may have occurred around 1250 BCE, and the Iliad was first written (after being passed down as oral poetry) around 725 BCE. Its writing predates the literary, philosophical and artistic flowering of the Greek "Golden Age" by more than 200 years. Yet this epic poem of humans and gods has survived and flourished because it is a great story with wonderful convincing characters, remarkable poetry and fascinating imagery, all enjoyable, even in translation.

I will be teaching from the Robert Fagles translation. Other well-known translations include those by Robert Fitzgerald and Richmond Lattimore in verse, and several in prose including Samuel Butler’s version on the internet. You may use any translation, but may find it easier to follow my references with Fagles. The verse translations attempt to catch the feeling of the Greek poetry of the original.

Class sections will cover material as follows:

Each class will address the scheduled books as well as different aspects of the entire poem.

Spain: Art and History Through the Ages

Spain: Art and History Through the Ages

Instructors: Tom Sheeran and Mary Flynn
Dates: Weds. Nov. 6, 13, 20, 27, Dec. 4
Time: 10 am - 12:30 pm
Location: Krauss 111

Description: Spain has a long history and equally extensive and varied artistic traditions from the earliest cave art to the stunningly modern architecture of today. Art and architecture are integral parts of the lives and times of the Spanish peoples who produced them. Examination of the rich legacy of themes and ideas from five major periods will help illuminate interpretation and meaning, both in their times and ours. In addition to slide lectures and commentary, documentary films will help to illustrate the most significant achievements in Spanish art and architecture. The five sessions will explore:

Culinary Cinema: Spain

Culinary Cinema: Spain

Facilitator: Tom Sheeran, World Traveler
Dates: Weds. Oct. 23, Nov. 13, Dec. 11
Time: 3 pm - 6 pm
Locations: View films in Krauss 111. Map/directions to post-film restaurant sites will be provided.
Enrollment limit: 24 and RSVPs are required for each session

Description: To accompany our class on Spanish art and history, three recent films will provide very different experiences of Spanish themes. As in previous Culinary Cinema classes, post-film dinners will be held at local restaurants, locations to be announced. We aim for pleasant, quiet neighborhood places with reasonable prices and entrees under $20. Participants will pay on-site for their own meals and drinks.

Films include:

Life Writing Workshop

Life Writing Workshop

Instructor: Ann Rayson, MA, PhD, Associate Professor English, (retired) UHM; professional editor
Dates: Alternate Tues., Oct. 22, Nov. 5, 19, Dec. 3, 17
Time: 1:30 pm - 3 pm
Location: Krauss 113-B seminar room

Description: This life writing workshop will explore the significant people, places, and events that have shaped our lives. We will share rough and finished writing; engage in creative writing exercises in class to prompts; and edit, revise, and peer review longer pieces of writing. The objective of the class is to gain a better understanding of self and culture and acquire techniques for more effective expression. Please bring the required text (see below) to every class session and be ready to participate in discussions and spot writing responses to prompts.

Writer’s Circle

Writer’s Circle

Dates: Meets alternate Tues., Oct. 15, 29, Nov. 12, 26, Dec. 10
Time: 1 pm - 3 pm
Location: Krauss 113-B seminar room
Enrollment limit: 10

Description: Those with a yen to write are invited to participate in this circle of serious writers. In this peer setting, we will take turns informally reading our own work for reaction and comment. Participants will have a chance to submit work on a regular basis. Enrollment in Writer’s Circle is limited. Previous participants will be given first preference.

Australian Desert Aborigines: A Moment in Time

Australian Desert Aborigines: A Moment in Time

Instructor: Richard Gould, PhD, RPA, Professor Emeritus, Anthropology, Brown University
Dates: Thurs., Oct. 10, 17, 24, 31, Nov. 7, 14
Time: 10 am - Noon
Location: Krauss 111

Description: In the early 1960s, Australian government patrols reported encountering small, isolated groups of Aborigines living in remote parts of the Western Desert. Some of these groups came into settlements, while others remained living off the land. This was a rare opportunity to see how they subsisted, made and used stone tools, conducted their social and sacred lives (including rock art and cave painting), and to observe other activities of special interest to archaeology. Betsy and I made two extended trips there between 1966 and 1970. These lectures are a "snapshot" of how these hunter-gatherers lived then and what it was like to meet them. It offers a look at a way of life that no longer exists and provides insights into how we evolved as a species.

Ocean Acidification: The Other CO2 Problem

Ocean Acidification: The Other CO2 Problem

Instructor: Fred T. Mackenzie, Professor Emeritus, UHM, Oceanography
Dates: Tues. Oct. 8, 15, 22, 29, Nov. 5, 12, 19
Time: 9:30 am - 11:30 am
Location: Krauss 111

Description: During the latter part of the 20th and early part of the 21st centuries, the world has been faced with major social and economic disruptions. Tied to these disruptions is the greatest environmental problem of the 21st century, that of global climatic change. What is not realized by many is that the fossil fuel and land-use change emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere are not only a cause of global warming of the planet but also an increase in acidity of our oceans. In this course we will review natural historical global climatic change and what that tells us about our present situation. Using this background as a framework, we will then discuss the modern environmental issue of global warming and ocean acidification and the economic and social implications of these phenomena.

Recommended texts for course include:

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